learning to love it

07.05.2007

As a kid I hated to read. Hated it! The only things I read were ski, running an backpacking magazines. Oh, and newspaper articles about my favorite baseball team.

School was torture. Textbooks and scholarly articles were the bane of my existence. My declared major was English education. Yeah, I know you must be asking yourself why did I choose that major—–the English part because I knew I hated to read, therefore I also knew I needed to get better at it. The education part because I love to help and teach people and possibly, because I was looking at weekends, summers and holidays off!

Fast forward to present day. If I hadn’t forced myself to read I would not be where I am today. I have learned more through the books that I’ve read than any other source of information in my life (except for the things I’ve learned through friendships relationships and children…but that’s a whole different story).

For me reading is a two-part process:

  • The information I am actually reading on the page and
  • The information on the page that makes me think and create new ideas (by far the most important in my opinion).

As I read I am constantly taking notes on paper as well as voice notes on my cell phone.
If the book is really good I can’t get through a page of reading before I’m off writing new ideas and thoughts in my notebook.

I still have a lot of work to do as the majority of the books I read (1-3 per week) are on business, sales, marketing and organizational topics (my top picks are on the right sidebar).  My wife thinks this is a travesty and I should enjoy fiction as well. Soon enough I tell her.

Anyway, I’ve read somewhere that reading (and writing) is the gateway to success and wealth. I’d have to agree.

So tell me this:
What books are on your list?

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5 Responses to “learning to love it”

  1. cptcrayon Says:

    “If the book is really good I can’t get through a page of reading before I’m off writing new ideas and thoughts in my notebook.”

    This is a good thing to remember. Good reading is active, not passive.

    A few books on my list:
    A Mathematician’s Apology ~ G.H. Hardy
    Seth Godin’s stuff
    The Everlasting Man ~ G.K. Chesterton

  2. EM Says:

    “Good reading is active, not passive.”

    That’s perfect cptcrayon-

    Thanks for the heads up on other books as well.

  3. StupidJimmy Says:

    Fiction will be your reward at the end of the climb. I think your strategy is wise, making noted while the thoughts are fresh.
    One way I’ve always managed to get more from educational reading is that I read through once, return and highlight, and then enter my highlighted text into Microsoft Word. Most of the reading I have to do lately is related to the Securities industry licensing, so I imagine it can as heavy as what you’re dealing with as well.

  4. Dave Says:

    Harry Potter, man. They’re the best. I got to read The Island of Doctor Moreau last week at scout camp, it totally freaked my out. I read it in a day. For the rest of the day I expected to see all the little hellions at camp with slitted pupils, running around on all fours as soon as I turn my back on them.


  5. […] learning to love it If the book is really good I can?t get through a page of reading before I?m off writing new ideas and thoughts in my notebook. I still have a lot of work to do as the majority of the books I read (1-3 per week) are on business, sales, … […]


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